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About Weigh Loss

diet-tipsYour weight is a balancing act, and calories are part of that equation. Fad diets may promise you that counting carbs or eating a mountain of grapefruit will make the pounds drop off. But when it comes to weight loss, it’s calories that count. Weight loss comes down to burning more calories than you take in. You can do that by reducing extra calories from food and beverages, and increasing calories burned through physical activity.

 Once you understand that equation, you’re ready to set your weight-loss goals and make a plan for reaching them. Remember, you don’t have to do it alone. Talk to your doctor, family and friends for support. Ask yourself if now is a good time and if you’re ready to make some necessary changes. Also, plan smart: Anticipate how you’ll handle situations that challenge your resolve and the inevitable minor setbacks.

If you have serious health problems because of your weight, your doctor may suggest weight-loss surgery or medications for you. In this case, you and your doctor will need to thoroughly discuss the potential benefits and the possible risks.

But don’t forget the bottom line: The key to successful weight loss is a commitment to making indefinite changes in your diet and exercise habits.

How can you lose weight? With diet and physical activity. The key to successful weight loss is developing healthy diet and exercise habits. You may not like those words — diet and exercise. Don’t get hung up on the words. Diet just means eating healthy, lower calorie meals. Exercise means being more active.

Although people appropriately focus on diet when they’re trying to lose weight, being active also is an essential component of a weight-loss program. When you’re active, your body uses energy (calories) to work, helping to burn the calories you take in with food you eat.

Cleaning the house, making the bed, shopping, mowing and gardening are all forms of physical activity. Exercise, on the other hand, is a structured and repetitive form of physical activity that you do on a regular basis.

Whatever activity you choose, do it regularly. Aim for at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity — preferably spread throughout the week. Keep in mind that you may need more physical activity to lose weight and keep it off.